Too Bloody Busy

So… I did read books in March. I read 4 books, but I honestly have not had the time to write reviews for them. Not even little ones (apart from one… but that was sent promotionally sooo)

Yeah basically my life is a mess rn, I had two presentations in 7 days which both were marked and counted for part of my masters and one presentation also had a poster with it which required modelling of lava flows and I had maaannyy late nights. Luckily my assignment that was due tomorrow has been pushed back by a month cause of Brexit mucking everything up royally, meaning I can actually take a few days to breath, relax and maybe even try and read.

But onto the books I read, no pretty pictures this month:

  • First Among Sequels by Jasper Fforde. I listened to this on audiobook and these books are always so much fun! I’ll be sad when I reach the end of this series
  • Spare and Found Parts by Sarah Maria Griffin. I’m so happy that I’ve finally read this beautiful work of literature, I 100% recommend if you’re a human being
  • The Devouring Gray by Christine Lynn Herman. Another book I recommend if you’re a human, actually have a full review of this one so check it out here!
  • The Time Keeper by Mitch Albom. Last book of the month, enjoyable and a quick read. Glad I picked it up.

 

I’m not making any concrete plans for April, but I am attempting the magical readathon and trying to do my O.W.L.’s so fingers crossed for that. I also have loads of assignments due at the end of April but maybe if I manage to keep track of my time I can be less stressed and keep on top of things? (That’ll never happen but I can still dream!!)

Thank you for putting up with me while I’ve been so MIA everywhere. The books I review will be less frequently posted soon as I run out of my backlogged reviews, but I promise to keep trying to post things. I just need to prioritise my masters’ rn. If you’ve got any questions about anything please do ask in the comments!

Just Henry by Michelle Magorian

Just Henry is an engrossing book based around the time of WWII. The book follows the life of a young boy, with a father who died in the war, living with his mother, step-father, gran and younger sister and his days at school and his love of photography.

Due to the stigmatisation which was common in those days and enforced by his grandmother, Henry is tested when partnered with two boys in school as one is a bastard (born when his parents were not married) and the other has a deserter for a father. He also meets a woman whilst trying to get into an age restricted film at the cinema and soon becomes friends with her. Through help from his unlikely friend as well as from his mother, teacher and what he truly believes; Henry becomes friends with these two boys.

He also develops (see what I did there) a love for photography and through help from both his teacher and his unlikely friend he starts taking pictures and learning how to make the best of the limited number of photos.

This love of photography and his close new friendships turn out to be crucial during a plot twist involving his father, gran, sister and a lot of worry.

The twist within this novel will have you glued to the pages as Magorian again manages to reel the reader in and not let go, this novel will grab you from the start and you’ll love learning about life in the post-WWII period as well as seeing the changes which occur at this time and how the characters develop.

Recommended for:

Those who love the WWII era.

This is my favourite era in history, meaning that I fell in love with this book almost instantly. The plot is easy to follow but also interesting and seems to stick to the historical accuracy of the time. The book shows what life was like once the war ended and how the countries landscape was changed, not only physically but mentally as people adjusted to others who were different with more ease.

Age recommendation:

Young Adults+

This book is aimed at ‘young adult’ readers with language and themes which may be slightly too mature for younger readers but which is simple enough that it is understandable. I would suggest that the reading age is around 12+ although this will vary from person to person, and many adults will enjoy this book as I still love it myself after many years.

Sorry for not posting in a while, I’ve had a busy summer! I hope you are all having a great time while the nice(ish) weather lasts!

Comment what books you would like me to review next 🙂
Theowlemporium